A message of hope for Easter, Passover and Ramadan





A message of hope for Easter, Passover and Ramadan

Dear Friends,
We are writing to see how you are, and provide you with an update about Together For Humanity during these challenging times. In these testing times, we really would like to know how you are faring. We’d be delighted if you’d drop us a line and let us know how you are doing. 
Our team are all doing fine, and Together For Humanity is still operating, although naturally we have had to adapt our activities given the current environment. 
We are in the process of moving some of our programs online. We are also working with schools to design wellbeing courses and other face-to-face programs for when children return to school. We understand that some students from certain ethnic groups may feel anxious about returning to school, and may be concerned they will be subject to prejudice and bullying behaviours. We are preparing resources for teachers to support these students, and foster harmony within their communities, once schools begin operating as before. 
Now, more than ever, supporting one another and staying connected is particularly important. All around the world, we are seeing examples of great kindness and concern for others. Doctors and medical staff are working overtime to help sick patients, people are doing shopping for their elderly neighbours, others are posting positive messages on social media. One way to build intercultural and interfaith goodwill is through social media. We have videos on our YouTube channelthat you might like to watch and share. 
As many Australians prepare to mark Easter, Passover and, later this month, Ramadan under social isolation, we echo the message of one of our Patrons, the Prime Minister Scott Morrison, who reminds us that the Passover Seder begins and ends with hope, that our time of affliction will pass, and next year may we be free. 
Similarly, the hope and comfort that comes from celebrating the Resurrection – life after death/mourning – is something all of humanity is longing for in the face of this global crisis. 
This year, the Muslim world enters a Ramadan potentially unlike any other in the history of the Islamic faith. With mosque doors closed globally and communities unable to partake in the Ramadan collective worship and gatherings upon which it was built, Muslims will be feeling a great sense of loss and longing. The human spirit, however, is wonderfully resilient, and at home many will still experience and strengthen a sense of community. The sacred month will be just as sacred - perhaps now more than ever.  
Take care and look after one another, 
Rabbi Zalman Kastel on behalf of the Together For Humanity team


 














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